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How to Put Out a Fire
How to Put Out a Fire

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How to Put Out a Fire
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How to Put Out a Fire

While fire is useful in our daily lives, it can be deadly when it gets out of control. According to the National Safety Council, at least one person dies from a fire every day. When a fire breaks out, it’s important to act quickly to keep the fire from getting out of control. A fire can spread rapidly, growing from a spark to a massive fire. So every second counts in an emergency fire situation.

There are different types of fires, and what works to put out one type of fire can sometimes worsen the situation in another. So it’s important to educate yourself on how to put out different types of fires as a way of being prepared for an unexpected fire situation.

  • Wood Burning Fire

Wood burning fire is categorized under class A fire and typically stems from a fire pit or fireplace. Class A fires involve solid combustibles such as wood, paper, cloth, plastic, coal, straw, trash, and any other ordinary combustible solids. To put out wood burning fire, use your fireplace poker to spread out the ashes and embers. This spreads out the heat, and the fire will eventually die out. The second step is to spread the burned-up ash over the embers to cool them down and slow down the heat. As the fire dies down, apply a layer of baking soda over the fire to accelerate the process. Ensure the fire is completely extinguished before scooping up the ashes for disposal.

  • Gas Fire

Gas fire is caused by combustible gas such as kerosene, propane, or natural gas. This type of fire is categorized under Class B fires which should be extinguished using a class B fire extinguisher. You should never use water to extinguish a gas fire as it will only worsen the situation.

  • Electrical Fire

Electrical fires can be caused by power surges, faulty electrical outlets, wiring issues, placing flammable material near electrical fixtures, and using ungrounded plugs. These fires are categorized under class C fires, so they should be extinguished using class C fire extinguishers. When an electrical fire starts, be sure to turn off the power at the electrical service panel. You should never use water to put out an electrical fire because water conducts electricity, which means you could be electrocuted. For a small electrical fire, apply a layer of baking over the fire to reduce oxygen.

  • Grease Fire

Grease fires are among the leading causes of home fires in the U.S. These fires usually start when oil cooking becomes too hot. When a grease fire breaks out, start by covering the flames with a metal lid, if possible, and then turn off the heat source. Do not pour water on a grease fire, as it can spread the fire even more. If the fire is small, apply a layer of baking soda on the flames. As a last resort, use a class K fire extinguisher to put out the fire.

If you’ve suffered fire damage and need fire damage restoration, call Tidal Wave Response. We are a reliable fire damage company offering a wide range of services, including fire damage restoration, water damage restoration, smoke damage restoration, and more.